Bark stripping – but by what? (Juliet’s Blog, March#2)

 New bark damage to orchard trees. Deer?

I have a Bushnell trail camera that I move around the garden and orchard from time to time to see what the wildlife is doing.

A few weeks back for the first time this winter there was a lot of bark stripping in the orchard, so I put up the camera hoping to discover the miscreant in the act. No such luck! Though, in a way it was lucky since the bark stripping has largely stopped.

Here is the rogues gallery.

I still suspect the worst damage is caused by Roe Deer though they didn’t show on the camera trap, as they are very common round here and I see them quite often in the garden. Or maybe Roe Deer and the very abundant Rabbits. And Grey Squirrels?

Well, at least I’m not blaming the Redwings. Most of the winter thrushes have now gone. The last big flock I saw was on 13 March with just the occasional individual since.

The sheep return to Longney

posted in: blossom, grazing, Longney, orchard | 0

Stuart Smith writes to say: that the sheep have returned to the orchard after spending winter at home on the farm. The lambs are a few weeks old, so not at the leaping for joy stage, but seemed to be enjoying the grass and the sun on their backs. Studies have shown that sheep recognise human faces, and this one seems to know our volunteer from last year!

If you leave the track in Long Tyning, you can walk beneath a canopy of apple blossom. The most common varieties here are Bramley’s Seedling and Newton Wonder – both cookers.

Joan Morgan says that when apple trees began to be included in formal gardens by the Victorians, and the blossom came to be valued as much as the fruit, “some of the grandest spring displays were to be found on the prolific cookers”.

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